Sol Republic Tracks Air Wireless Headphones (Review)

Posted By Analie Cruz on Jan 29, 2014 |

We are big fans of Sol Republic here at Tech We Like. We reviewed the original Sol Republic Tracks and the Sol Republic Tokidoki headphones. While the headband is different, they have the same cans as the Tracks HD.  Sol Republic is known for their interchangeable headbands and quality sound at an affordable price.

Sol Republic x Motorola Tracks Air Headphones Review - Analie Cruz - Tech WE Like

Sol Republic x Motorola Tracks Air Headphones Review

You can buy the Sol Republic Tracks Air for $199 HERE  

They have recently added a new pair of headphones to their lineup and you already know that we’re all over it.  The new pair of Sol Republic x Motorola Tracks Air are Sol Republic’s first pair of wireless headphones. While 2013 was the boom of wireless speakers, we didn’t see a huge rise of wireless headphones, especially wireless on-ear headphones.

Sol Republic Track Air Design

So when you first look at the Sol Republic Tracks Air, they look just like the original Tracks HD, Tracks Ultra. The “cans” are removable and slide up and down the headband. The padding AKA the SonicSoft speaker pads, is still cushiony and comfortable like previous Sol Republic models.

Sol Republic x Motorola Tracks Air Headphones Review - Analie Cruz - Tech WE Like - Bottom

Sol Republic x Motorola Tracks Air Headphones Review

The Tracks Air headband is not called FlexTech like other Sol Republic models; the Tracks Air headband is called PowerTrack. It’s available in four colors, Ice White, Gunmetal, Vivid Red, and Electro Blue. I have the white version, which makes the headband and the cans white. The head cushion on the inside of the headband is black.

Sol Republic x Motorola Tracks Air Headphones Review - Analie Cruz - Tech WE Like -Headband Transmitter Motorola Logo 1   Sol Republic x Motorola Tracks Air Headphones Review - Analie Cruz - Tech WE Like - Sound Cans Separately

So now how are the Tracks Air different than other Sol Republic headphones? When you look closely at the inside of the PowerTrack headband, on each side you see too metal strips on the bottom half. Each cans has connectors for the metal bands.

Sol Republic x Motorola Tracks Air Headphones Review - Right Ear Sound Can

Sol Republic x Motorola Tracks Air Headphones Review – Right Ear Sound Can – Volume Rocker and Power Button

The right side can has most of the power. You find the power button (which lights up to indicate pairing mode, battery life), which is a bit flushed, as you go along the can, you find the curved volume rocker, and then near the bottom you find the play/pause, answer/hang-up button. At the bottom of the right can, you have the micro USB charging port and next to it you have the 3.5 mm input jack (the left can has the 3.5 mm jack also).  You also have the microphone at the bottom, which allows you to take calls.

Sol Republic x Motorola Tracks Air Headphones Review - Analie Cruz - Tech WE Like Side Can View

Sol Republic x Motorola Tracks Air Headphones Review – Side Can Volume Rocker and Control Button

The look is simplistic and it’s nice that Sol Republic didn’t change their style up on the wireless set.  The Tracks Air are heavier than my Tracks HD set, but not a noticeable amount.

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Tracks Air Features

What makes the Tracks Air different is that they connect via Bluetooth and NFC.  They allow you to pair two devices to the headphones. Sol Republic says that the headphones can go up to 15 hours of continuous music playback on a single charge.

Sol Republic x Motorola Tracks Air Headphones Review - Analie Cruz - Tech WE Like NFC Sticker

Sol Republic x Motorola Tracks Air Headphones – NFC Sticker

Sol Republic also promises great sound. To make sure sound isn’t compromised due to wireless mode, the Tracks Air have an A2 Engine. What that means (according to Sol Republic) is that the A2 engine is powered by a larger digital amplifier which will produce sound that is equal to or better than wired.

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Experience

After a full charge (the power button was green), I took my Tracks Air for their test run. I paired it to my Motorola Moto X, and for some reason I am still surprised at NFC’s quick pairing/ connection. When you first hit the power button for a few seconds after turning on, the Sol Republic Tracks Air man says: “Tracks Air is ready to pair” (you hear a little futuristic chime). After pairing he then lets you know, “More than 13 hours of playtime.”  That’s always good to know. When changing the volume you will also hear beeps that get louder as you go up and lower as you go down.  So it’s safe to say that the Tracks Air notify you of everything that is going on. I need that because you know that I’m not a fan of my gadgets dying out on me.

Sol Republic x Motorola Tracks Air Headphones Review - Analie Cruz - Tech WE Like With Moto X Pink Back Cover

Sol Republic x Motorola Tracks Air Headphones Review With Moto X Pink Back Cover

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Tracks Air Sound Quality and Testing

While I didn’t listen to music for 13 hours straight, I did leave music playing with the Tracks Air paired and sure enough it went over 13 hours. The most I listened to music was 3 hours continuously. As for the distance and hiccups, I managed to go from one end of the apartment to the other without interruption. You can go farther if there are no walls in the way, I figured this out in a university hallway.

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As for the sound, I did my analyzing of my favorite tracks and even added some new ones into the mix. I went with my usual test track, Michael Jackson’s “Billie Jean”. I used Google Play Music Al Access for all my testing. I always try to notice the intensity of the bass and snare drum of Billie Jean when it comes to testing audio. I also listened to Linkin Park’s “Waiting for the End“.

The wireless mode of the Tracks Air doesn’t compromise sound. It was one of my biggest concerns when going wireless is the flat sound, but I was surprised. Vocals aren’t as loud as the beat is, but they are clear.

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The bass is good but sometimes falls a little flat. Once I fixed the equalizer, it was all better. The mids are great with no distortion at even the highest volume. The highs are okay, but you can’t really notice any difference.  Most beats sound great overall, might be because of the app. They have a good balance.

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Sol Republic Tracks Air Overall

Since I’ve used Sol Republic headphones before, I had an idea what to expect. For those trying them for the first time, you will find these headphones comfortable and lightweight. They don’t compress your head since the headband is flexible in pretty much every direction. So no matter how wide or narrow your face is, the Sol’s will fit. The cans do a great job of noise isolation.

Sol Republic x Motorola Tracks Air Headphones Review - Analie Cruz - Tech WE Like Package Contents and Moto X 1

Sol Republic x Motorola Tracks Air Headphones Review – Package Contents and Motorola Moto X

At $199, the Tracks Air are more affordable than other corded headphones out there, and you’re definitely getting a major bang for your buck. I originally recommended the Sol Republic lineup to ladies because while they are on-ear headphones, they aren’t too big or overbearing. The same can definitely be said about the Tracks Air. In a time where many are trying to cut the cord, these would be a great pair to have on your headphone roster.

You can buy the Sol Republic Tracks Air for $199 HERE 

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